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Rabies

Published on . Last modified on August 7, 2015

Rabies is a preventable viral disease of mammals most often transmitted through the bite of a rabid animal.  Nationwide, the vast majority of rabies cases reported each year occur in wild animals like raccoons, skunks, bats, and foxes.  In California, skunks and bats are most frequently infected.  More than 55,000 people, mostly in Africa and Asia, die from rabies every year – a rate of one person every ten minutes.

Signs and Symptoms

The first symptoms of rabies may be very similar to those of the flu including general weakness or discomfort, fever, or headache.  These symptoms may last for days.  There may be also discomfort or a prickling or itching sensation at the site of bite, progressing within days to symptoms of cerebral dysfunction, anxiety, confusion, agitation. As the disease progresses, the person may experience delirium, abnormal behavior, hallucinations, and insomnia.  The acute period of disease typically ends after 2 to 10 days with death.CDC_Rabiesprevention_300x600

Transmission (How it Spreads)

All species of mammals are susceptible to rabies virus infection, but only a few species are important as reservoirs for the disease. In the United States, distinct strains of rabies virus have been identified in raccoons, skunks, foxes, and coyotes. Several species of insectivorous bats are also reservoirs for strains of the rabies virus.

Transmission of rabies virus usually begins when infected saliva of a host is passed to an uninfected animal. The most common mode of rabies virus transmission is through the bite and virus-containing saliva of an infected host. Though transmission has been rarely documented via other routes such as contamination of mucous membranes (i.e., eyes, nose, mouth), aerosol transmission, and corneal and organ transplantations.

Testing and Treatment

In animals, rabies is diagnosed using the direct fluorescent antibody (DFA) test, which looks for the presence of rabies virus antigens in brain tissue.  In humans, several tests are required.

Once a person begins to exhibit signs of the disease, survival is rare. To date less than 10 documented cases of human survival from clinical rabies have been reported and only two have not had a history of pre- or postexposure prophylaxis.  Treatment is typically supportive.

Prevention

Animals:

There are several things you can do to protect your pet from rabies.  First, visit your veterinarian with your pet on a regular basis and keep rabies vaccinations up-to-date for all cats, ferrets, and dogs.  Second, maintain control of your pets by keeping cats and ferrets indoors and keeping dogs under direct supervision.  Third, spay or neuter your pets to help reduce the number of unwanted pets that may not be properly cared for or vaccinated regularly.  Finally, call animal control to remove all stray animals from your neighborhood since these animals may be unvaccinated or ill.

People: 

Rabies in humans is 100% preventable through prompt appropriate medical care.  Disease prevention includes administration of both passive antibody, through an injection of human immune globulin and a round of injections with rabies vaccine.  Children are often at greatest risk from rabies.  They are more likely to be bitten by dogs, and are also more likely to be severely exposed through multiple bites in high-risk sites on the body.  Severe exposures make it more difficult to prevent rabies unless access to good medical care is immediately available.

 

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